The Legend Of Lakshmi Prasad

Twinkle Khanna started her literary career as a weekly celebrity blogger for Time of India. Her first book Mrs.Funnybones raced to the bestseller list in no time and this is her second book. With rather a simple cover page consisting of mangoes and a girl reaching out to them, it hides the complexity of the book.This book is a collection of four short stories, simple on the surface, but with deeper depths, if you look for them.

The first story is about Lakshmi Prasad, a young village girl surrounded by the despondencies of everyday rural life. The simple farmer, his poverty and the need to provide dowries for his daughters. The stark ugly truth about India, of why the girl child is so unwanted for and the Lakshmi Prasad’s revolt against this. The story drives home the need for the empowerment of girls so that we can rise above the ills of dowry system and girl infanticide. The lesson is simple to learn, empower the girl to change the society.

The second story is Salaam, Noni Appa. Noni Appa is a simple soul, who has led an exemplary life. She likes the respect with which people on the street would say to her “Salaam, Noni Appa”. Her relationship with her sister Binni can only be understood by someone who has siblings.The pushing, prodding, teasing, commenting and the underlying layer of love and affection for each other. The incident where Noni, matter-of-factly tells Binni to eat Kayam Churan as Binni had eaten mutton patties underlines their relationship so well.  There is, however, a loneliness in Noni’s life. Her dressing up for her departed husband on what would have been their forty-eighth wedding anniversary had a subliminal poignancy; you could feel Noni’s sadness and love for her husband. Anandji, on the other hand, is as alone as Noni, even though his wife is alive and kicking ( or screaming in this case).  Both of them finding companionship and affection for each other comes as no surprise. There is courage needed to understand and accept the fact that you have limited days on this planet (even less if you are on the wrong side of sixty) and to take a conscious decision to spend those days with the person making you happy.  Anandji and Noni had that courage to accept that they were happier together and this is what made it such an endearing love story.

“If The Weather Permits” is the darkest story amongst the four, where the weather on the wedding day is the barometer of whether Elisa Thomas’s wedding will last or not. Elisa Thomas’s story is about a young woman who refuses to be boxed in and thus baffles her Malayali Christian parents. Her parents have one and only goal of seeing her married off to a good Christian boy of their community. In the words of her father “Deaf and dumb, but a man is a man is a man”. Therein lies the problem, the urge of Indian parents to marry their daughters to a man whom they, the parents, rather than the girl, think is suitable. Failing to get a man from their community they are ready for any man, but the girl needs to be married. Even a girl as free spirited and independent as Elisa succumbs to marry Chacko if only to get her parents off her back for some time. Of course that she repented it almost instantaneously comes as no surprise. The story challenges the conventional mindset of the need for marriage for women to make them complete.

The best story is of course saved for last “The Sanitary Man from a Sacred Land”.  The story is of Bablu Kewat’s crusade to provide low-cost sanitary napkins to the women of India especially in the rural areas. Bablu’s journey started with his need to provide his wife with safe, hygienic and low-cost sanitary napkins which soon developed into a crusade. He was however abandoned by the very people for whom he had sacrificed everything. His invention ultimately becomes a tool for social change and female upliftment. Inspired by a true story Bablu Kewat’s story is inspiring as he kept bouncing back whenever life knocked him down. And always comes back up with a smile. He shows exemplary values and courage in returning to the same village from where he was kicked out off. The irony of the villagers who once vilified him, welcoming him back with open arms after he becomes famous is not lost.

The author takes you through her descriptions to rural Bihar, Ismaili Bombay, Christian Kerela and semi-urban Madhya Pradesh. The descriptions are vivid, you can almost see Noni Appa clinking her glass with the one of her husband’s in her pearls and chiffon sari. The author’s writing is not defined by her metaphors or extensive vocabulary.One might even say that her writing is too simplistic. I will agree, the book cannot be classified as a classic but a vacation read. However to dismiss her out of hand would be unfair to her and her stories. The beauty of her writing I think is simplicity. The stories are straightforward, true, but if you look closely they are all about women and the need for them to be in charge of their own destinies. The characters strong and identifiable. What is exceptional about her writing is the way she infuses humour in the most common occurrences but still, manages to raise pertinent issues.

That is where Ms.Khanna has scored, she has turned the “Aam Admi” and made him/her the HERO!

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